Category Archives: Community

Dawson & Carter’s Story

In the two weeks leading up to Dawson’s diagnosis, we had no idea what was going on. All of the symptoms were innocuous. Dawson had been drinking a lot of water. We had written it off to being winter time. We were all drinking water due to the dry air in the house. He was moody. Well he was a three year old… Click here to continue reading Dawson and Carter’s Story…

*Learn more here JDRF and get involved in helping to find a cure for Dawson and Carter and many other kids like them!

 


CSC Homeless Run

Please help us as we support CSC Homeless Run hosted by Robyn McManis.

Christmas Day is one of the happiest days of the year, unless you are homeless, living on the streets of RVA. Every year, CSC family and friends organizes a fundraising event to purchase brand new coats and boots, as well as a meal and hot coffee for area homeless people. Continue reading…

Ways you can help:

Purchase (and drop off at either CSC or our office Knight Magee Insurance):

  • New Winter Coat (no used) in men’s sizes medium, large, extra large or XXLarge. The thicker the better and hoods are nice and warm!
  • New Boots (no used) in men’s sizes 9, 9 1/2, 10, 10 1/2, 11, 11 1/2, 12
  • Make a donation! Donations can be a check or cash that you drop off at CSC. You can also donate via PayPal at carystcafehomelessrun@yahoo.com. 100% of all donations will go towards the purchase of new coats and boots.

Follow the Facebook Page for more information and/or to volunteer!


Back to School Safety

As kids head back to school, let’s keep them safe

The end of summer means many things, such as cooler weather, shorter days and the start of football here in RVA!

But most important, it means kids are headed back to school. And that means we all should be extra careful on the roads, in school zones and around buses. Remember to watch for bikes, too! Here are some tips for both parents and kids to make sure everyone stays safe.

Use caution on the roads 

  • There are going to be a lot more kids on the sidewalks and streets when school starts, so take it slow and always be aware of your surroundings. That’s good advice for all situations, of course, but be extra cautious around the times when school starts and ends for the day.
  • Watch out for school zones! They’re usually easy to spot, as many have flashing signs indicating a slower speed limit.
  • Remember to follow school-bus rules. You aren’t allowed to pass the bus on either side of the road when the red lights are flashing. Even when the lights stop, make sure the coast is clear before moving on. Kids can move quickly and erratically.
  • Leave yourself extra time to make it to your destination. Whether you’re headed to work or dropping your child off at school, rushing is a recipe for disaster.
  • Be especially careful in school or child-care parking lots and loading zones!

Teach kids to be safe while walking  

Just a few minutes spent explaining some basic safety rules to your child can help keep them safe when they’re walking to or from school. Young children should never cross streets alone, but if your child is old enough to walk with others, remind them to do the following:

  • Always use marked crosswalks when crossing streets and look both ways twice.
  • Do not assume that drivers can see you. Try to make eye contact with them, if possible, when crossing the street.
  • Watch for driveways when walking on the sidewalk.
  • Be aware of cars that are turning or backing up.
  • Never move into the street from behind a car or other obstacle. Don’t chase a ball, pet or anything else into the street.
  • Always use sidewalks and paths. If there is no sidewalk or path, walk facing traffic and as far to the left as possible.

Help them stay safe on their bikes

Just as it’s important to help your children learn safety tips for walking to and from school, it’s important to teach bike safety, especially by setting good examples yourself.

  • Make sure your child wears a properly fitted helmet every time he or she rides a bike.
  • Before the bicycle is ridden, do a quick inspection to ensure it is working properly and reflectors are in place.
  • Show your kids how to ride on the right side of the road with traffic and to stay as far to the right as possible.
  • Encourage your child to walk his or her bike across busy intersections. Or better yet, choose a route without any busy crossroads.
  • Explain to your child why no one should ride on the handlebars.
  • Demonstrate the rules of the road by using proper hand signals and obeying traffic signs when you ride bikes together with your child.
  • Set curfews so your child is not riding a bicycle at dusk or in the dark.
  • Most importantly, supervise your children every time they ride until you are certain they have good judgment.

We know you’re probably familiar with all of these good ideas, but everyone needs reminders. So take it slow, and let’s have a happy and safe school year!


Back to School

Insurance Tips for Back-to-School Time

College is expensive enough without finding out too late that an accident or theft isn’t covered under your current policies. So, as you get your children ready to head off to school in the fall, there’s one vital “to-do” to add to your list (other than writing that tuition check): a review of your insurance coverage.

It’s important to keep in mind that policy language varies from state to state, and there are never “one-size-fits-all” situations, but below is a general guide. If you have questions, or want to go over your insurance needs, don’t hesitate to contact us!

HOMEOWNERS (may vary by state and individual policy)

Coverage of personal property: Most homeowner’s policies provide 10 percent of Coverage C (Personal Property) for property owned by an insured that is at a residence other than the insured’s. For example, if the contents of a policyholder’s home are insured for $100,000, a student’s property up to $10,000 would be covered if living in a dormitory – provided the damage is caused by a covered peril and the student meets the definition of an insured.

For apartments or houses off-campus, the same coverage generally applies. Certain items, such as jewelry or expensive electronics, may require special coverage, or a “rider.” Renters insurance is strongly recommended.

Liability coverage: There usually is exclusion for damage to property rented to an insured, so generally damage to a dorm room or apartment would not be covered, unless the student carriers renters insurance.

Ensuring adequate coverage: Contact us to get specific answers and information about your coverages. Also, it’s a great idea to create an inventory of the items your student is taking to school, as is keeping photos of and receipts for the items.

Renters insurance: If your student’s needs can’t be met under your current policy, don’t forget renters insurance. Landlords’ policies generally only cover the structure, not the possessions of renters.

AUTO (may vary by state)

Coverage without a car at school: If your student will continue to drive while at home on school breaks, they should continue to be listed on your auto policy. If they are attending school more than 100 miles from home, and are not taking a vehicle with them, the policy may qualify for a distant-student discount.

Coverage with a car at school: In most instances, a car registered to parents and listed on their policy will be covered if used by a listed student away at school. But you should make sure that your insurance carrier writes coverage in the college’s state and location. And note that a change to the principal location of the vehicle could result in a change in premium.

Driving a friend’s car at school: Students generally would be covered while driving a friend’s car if the students are listed on their parents’ policy and do not have regular use of the vehicle. The coverage would likely be secondary in this case, as the carrier for the friend’s vehicle likely would be the primary coverage.

Coverage discounts: In addition to the possible distant-student discount mentioned above, students may qualify for a good-student discount. To qualify, most insurance carriers require that a student must be enrolled in at least four courses per term as a full-time student at an accredited college or university and meet certain academic qualifications. Also, drivers under the age of 21 who complete a driver education course may be eligible for a policy discount.

Going away to school is an exciting time for both students and their parents. Making sure you’ve got the right insurance coverage can help you protect your assets as you invest in your child’s future. We’re happy to discuss your coverage and options — just give us a call (804) 320-0129 or stop by!

 


Stress Awareness Month

Relax! April is Stress Awareness Month

Believe it or not, the average stress level of Americans has dropped since 2007, according to the American Psychological Association (APA).

But, we here at Knight Magee Insurance understand if you don’t exactly feel that way.

Even though things have improved, the APA’s most recent Stress in America™ survey indicates that Americans are still living with stress levels higher than what’s considered healthy. And nearly one-quarter of respondents say they aren’t doing enough to manage it.

It’s a good thing, then, that Stress Awareness Month is here. Held every April since 1992 and sponsored by the nonprofit Health Resource Network, Stress Awareness Month is a “national, cooperative effort to inform people about the dangers of stress, successful coping strategies and harmful misconceptions about stress that are prevalent in our society.”

Stress management doesn’t just help you feel calmer and more focused. It’s important to your overall health. Constant exposure to stress can trigger your brain’s alarm system to remain in alert mode, flooding your system with the hormones you need to take flight or fight when facing danger, according to the Mayo Clinic. This causes more stress in and of itself. And, all that stress can cause problems with your health, your relationships and your overall quality of life.

So, reducing your stress is well worth your while, and, if you don’t know where to start, we’re here to help. These tips from the Mayo Clinic and WebMD will get you headed in the right direction:

  • Make stress management a goal — and make a commitment to that goal. Simply saying, “I want to reduce stress” isn’t enough. You’ve got to learn to identify problems and implement solutions, which takes work.
  • Identify your triggers. What situations cause you to experience stress? Work? Relationships? Thinking about money? Don’t overlook everyday tasks, such as commuting, or even positive events, such as starting a new job.
  • Consider strategies to deal with those specific triggers. For example, creating a budget plan or talking to a financial adviser could help ease your worries about finances. Changing your hours at work could potentially improve your commute.
  • Practice relaxation techniques and live a healthy lifestyle. Here are just a few tools that people use to help alleviate stress:
  • Deep breathing, yoga or tai chi
  • Meditation and guided imagery — imagining yourself in a place of relaxation
  • Writing or talking to someone about your feelings
  • Exercise (even simple stretching or housework) and outdoor recreation
  • Art and other creative projects
  • Ask for help. Many people you know have probably experienced similar stresses to your own. Find out how they have solved problems and relieved stress. And, if they are still having trouble, you can work on managing issues together. 

April in RVA is a great time to try to reduce stress and live a healthier life. So, what are you waiting for? At the end of the month, see how you feel. Keep doing the things that worked for you; stop doing the things that didn’t.

Remember, when you make stress management a bigger part of your life, you leave less room for the stress itself.


Earth Day

Take part in an Earth Day event — or celebrate in your own way 

People are thinking more and more about the environment — whether it’s something that affects the quality of life here in RVA or global issues such as climate change and extreme weather.

But more importantly, people aren’t content with simply thinking about these things any more. They’re focused on taking action.

Earth Day, which is celebrated April 22, is the perfect time to take action, whether you are looking to take part in a community event or organize your own. Here are some tips to help you get involved — and think about our planet Earth all through the year.

Find an event

It’s easy to find Earth Day events, whether you live in the city or a surrounding county. City and town Facebook pages are a great place to start, along with the websites of local environmental organizations. Newspapers, radio and TV often publicize events as well.

The Environmental Protection Agency website lists major Earth Day activities at: https://www.epa.gov/earthday/index.html.

What can I do?

There are all kinds of Earth Day activities, even some you can easily complete by yourself or with your family. Examples include:

  • Planting trees
  • Cleaning up litter from a natural area or park
  • Adopting a road for litter control
  • Talking about Earth Day and helping to educate others
  • Using alternate transportation, instead of taking your car
  • Holding a garage sale or clothing swap, rather than throwing out unwanted items
  • Learning more about actions you can take to reduce your environmental impact

What if I want to organize an event?

Hosting an event doesn’t have to be a Herculean task, particularly if you keep it small. Any of the ideas above could be turned into your own event — just get the word out via social media, friends and family or even local print and broadcast media. But if you do want to organize a full-scale event, go for it!

Make it more than a day

Of course, one of the best ways to have an impact is to make every day your own Earth Day. You can take part in earth-friendly activities at any time! So in addition to celebrating once a year, make this April 22 just the beginning of something special. Whether you find an event or create your own, the important thing is getting involved!

 


Successful Fundraiser

The Fundraiser for Evie took place Friday, March 9, 2018. The event was a huge success and it’s because of the many individuals and businesses who pulled resources together to make it possible. $7,000 raised in one evening between ticket sales and silent auction items.

Big thanks to The Westin Richmond for hosting! Rachel Leyco not only had an amazing show, but she also helped with all the announcements throughout the evening!

Tricia & Lauren helped us pull together items for the silent auction; they also made sure we were getting the word out on social media. They were the first two we approached about having the event and were immediately on board to come together and make it happen!

The Westin Richmond was so AMAZING to work with. They provided an amazing venue and staff, they coordinated and prepared the food, provided the DJ, photo booth and more.

Dr. Sarah Wilmer with Manakin Sabot Dentistry and Tammy from the Green Kitchen approached us just a week or so before the event to offer resources for food. The contributions they made ensured we had enough food since we had more than exceeded our goal for ticket sales.

Many thanks to everyone else who chipped in by attending, volunteering, and donating items and services to the auction. We love RVA and this event was the perfect example of just how amazing our community truly is!

Many have asked for the go fund me page.

Thank you again for being a part of this event it meant so much to us at Knight Magee Insurance to see our clients, friends and other local businesses rally together to support The Poland’s.

 


Baby Evie Fundraiser Update

Category : Community , Fundraising , General , KMI

This week we got a glimpse of the evening’s menu and again The Westin Richmond has gone ABOVE and BEYOND!  When the Westin agreed to donate space for the event I think we all thought it was just that, a venue… but boy were we wrong… they are also providing food (Dr. Sarah Wilmer DDS has also made a generous monetary donation toward the cost of food), a cash bar, a DJ, a videographer who has created a video detailing Evie’s story, a photo booth, staff, and ongoing support to help iron out all the fine details.

In addition to The Westin Richmond, close family friends Tricia Norris and Lauren White have helped with organizing the silent auction. Together we’ve secured services and/or items from over 34 local RVA businesses.

And we can’t forget Rachel Leyco… 

Rachel will be performing at the event. Rachel, a Richmond Native, has been in the Richmond music scene for over a decade, she is a singer and songwriter, and in my opinion one of the most talented performers in RVA!

When we discussed organizing a fundraiser for the Poland’s I don’t think we realized its true potential and here we are less than a week away with almost 98 tickets sold. I’m in awe and I can’t thank everyone enough for the support. When the community comes together for a cause it’s powerful. We all have something to contribute and together we’re making a difference. Xo –Sierra Knight Magee

*Tickets are still available so if you haven’t purchased yours yet please do. Buy Tickets Here


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